Ar 15 Scopes Reviews

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Ar 15 Scopes Reviews News:

Barska AR-15 Red Dot Sight 1x 30mm Illuminated Tactical Reticle

Read complete review. I put the scope on a bushmaster AR-15 it shot beautifully for the first two shots then the scope broke completely after the third the reticle …

Original Source: http://www.midwayusa.com/product/678529/barska-ar-15-red-dot-sight-1x-30mm-illuminated-tactical-reticle-with-picatinny-style-rifle-scope-base-matte

3-9X42 Ultimate AR-15 Scope – www.valhallaarmory.com

The Ultimate AR-15 scope is exactly what you’ve been looking for! It offers everything you want in an AR-15 scope! Your search is over. The Ultimate AR-15 Scope …

Original Source: http://www.valhallaarmory.com/3_9X42_Ultimate_AR_15_Scope_p/st3942gdmod1.htm

Barska AR-15 Red Dot Sight 1x 30mm Illuminated Tactical Reticle

Read complete review. I put the scope on a bushmaster AR-15 it shot beautifully for the first two shots then the scope broke completely after the third the reticle …

Original Source: http://www.midwayusa.com/product/678529/barska-ar-15-red-dot-sight-1x-30mm-illuminated-tactical-reticle-with-picatinny-style-rifle-scope-base-matte

Ar 15 Scope – Compare Prices, Reviews and Buy at Nextag

Ar 15 Scope – 396 results like Firefield 2.510X40mm Ar15 / M16 Laser Scope ‘, Viper HD 15-45×65 Angled Spotting Scope, Ar-15/M16 M-223 Scopes – Nikon M-223 3-12x42sf …

Original Source: http://www.nextag.com/ar-15-scope/stores-html

3-9X42 Ultimate AR-15 Scope – www.valhallaarmory.com

The Ultimate AR-15 scope is exactly what you’ve been looking for! It offers everything you want in an AR-15 scope! Your search is over. The Ultimate AR-15 Scope …

Original Source: http://www.valhallaarmory.com/3_9X42_Ultimate_AR_15_Scope_p/st3942gdmod1.htm


AR15 Upper Build: Dust Cover & Forward Assist Install

Fun Gun reviews Presents: AR15 Upper Build: Dust Cover & Forward Assist Install. Using basic tools, we install the parts to complete our initial upper build….


Q&A:

Zacery asked What is the best rimfire under the AR platform?

Im in the market for a rim fire but want it under the AR platform, price doesn’t really matter. Also, what scope would be nice to throw on it for under say $150? Thank you!

Im currently looking into the HK 416D but have seen a lot of positive reviews for the SW M&P 15-22.

And got the following answer:

CMMG manufactures the best .22 LR AR-type. http://www.cmmginc.com/category_s/1516.htm Unfortunately prices have risen due to demand, and it’s likely you will be facing a long wait.

PurpleNurple asked DPMS LR-TAC20 AR-15 in .308 Winchester?

I have an AR-15 right now (.223) and was thinking of trading it in for this DPMS LR-TAC20 (.308 WIN). I have not heard any reviews on this rifle anywhere, so does anyone know how good it is? Also, what do you think i could get for my AR-15 with the trade in? Here are the details:

Rifle- Smith&Wesson AR-15, flat top, 16 inch barrel (about $850 new)

Handguard- Free float picatinny quad-rail (about $180 used)

Optics- 1 NCStar 2-7x40mm quick detatch scope (about $150 new). 1 Guide Gear 10-40x50mm tactical long range scope ($130 new). 1 set of UTG flip up iron sights ($50 new, for the set, I know I got a hell of a deal, these things are usually $70 a piece!)

Also have a CAA pivot pod grip and a very high quality green laser sight but I think I am going to keep them for the .308 AR. Everything else above I am going to sell so what do you think I could get for it?
i did know you could do that but i think the lower on the .308 model is a little bit bigger than the one on my .223.

And got the following answer:

You cannot changer the uppers on these AR15 rifles between a rifle chambered in .308 and .223…. The receivers are different… You can change uppers to a number of ammo variations but not the .308…… Its too big…

DPMS makes a fine product…. Although I have never owned one I have fired the DPMS Panthers in .223 / 5.56 and it was a pleasure to shoot…..

http://www.dpmsinc.com/

Check out these cartridge guides…..
http://www.6mmbr.com/223Rem.html

http://www.6mmbr.com/308Win.html

ScarsOnBroadway asked What is a good rifle scope for an AR-15?

for shooting at about 150 yards. (5.56 ammo) I want to stay between $100-$250.

And got the following answer:

I’d really recommend that you get “hands on” with any scope before you purchase it. For me, Leupolds are very finicky. If I move my eye left or right even a little I lose a clear view. I find Bushnell and Nikon much more “forgiving”. Leupolds are great scopes–almost a ubiquitous standard–but not the best for me. They tend to cost more than comparable scopes because of their well-deserved reputation but you may not want to pay the premium. I think the best way to decide is to handle a few scopes in a store. You’re likely to find you prefer a brand or two.

You might want to go to Optics Planet and read about scopes to help you decide. They’re a good source of info and customer reviews (http://www.opticsplanet.net/riflescopebesandtop.html). You will likely choose a hunting scope for the AR but you should also look at the tactical models and the write-ups to understand the differences before you buy one.

As far as best value, I would recommend the Bushnell Elite 3200 series. The lenses are multi-coated, the scope is very strong, has great light transmission, and isn’t intimidated by the weather. I like the 3-9×40 the best (http://www.opticsplanet.net/bu3el32hascw.html) if you don’t mind the 40mm objective. It’s only $200. If you’d like a little more compact model that’s a little lower to the rifle, look at the Bushnell Elite 3200 2-7×32 (http://www.opticsplanet.net/bushnell-elite-3200-2-7x32mm-riflescope-w-rainguard-322732m.html).

Pacheco asked What do i need to buy a Semi-Automatic Rifle in California?

Im turning 18 and i want to know if i need any special permit or any thing of the sort since it is California. Any accurate information will help Thank you.

And got the following answer:

I asked that very same question myself when I turned 18, but to buy a .22LR rifle instead. In California its not much different from any of the neighboring states in terms of requirements, only the procedure is different.

Legally able to keep and bear arms:
18 yrs long gun, 21 handgun (plus HSC permit)
not a felon
no warrants for your arrest (anywhere)
not on trial of a crime that may prohibit you from owning a firearm
mentally sane: no history of mental illness anywhere, anytime
legal citizen of the united states
CA ID or Driver’s License
If ID has no address, you must bring a proof of residence paper (that can be a utility bill or bank statement bill with you address) to show that you live there.

some tips:
don’t buy a pistol caliber rifle, you can’t buy ammo for it until you’re 21. nevermind what the federal or state law says, its some kind of unofficial rule nowadays. It went int o effect around 8 months ago, when I went to buy some more .22LR ammo. I haven’t been able to get any since. Lucky I stockpiled it while it was cheap, some 20k odd rounds or so, and I’m turning 21 soon too. And yes, .22LR applies to this rule. Looks like to me a way to prevent young people from owning guns at all, so no new gun owners anymore?
Don’t buy an AK/AR type rifle as your first firearm, unless you have fired other guns regularly before. You’ll be buying online and its a lot different from buying in a store, and since we’re in California, there is a premium CA residents need to pay for such rifles, generally 200% outside price, loss of”evil” features, and little stumpy 10rd magazines that costs a lot.
Its best to start with the basics when it comes to shooting, there is nothing wrong with buying a .22 as your first rifle. you can learn how to shoulder correctly, use irons sights, use a scope, and ammo is very cheap. Just get some dude 21 or older to buy the ammo for you if the store people won’t let you buy any ammo. Its not illegal, just a hassle.

the process:
you pick out what you’d like to own
the store employee will bring out some paperwork, the employee may ask you for your ID at that time. The paper is ATF form 4473, answer truthfully as possible, the government really does want to know your race, and put your SSN down to avoid misidentification (has happened to me once)
The employee may ask for your thumbprint
a background check is done on the computer (varies by store) then you have a 10 day “cooling off” period, which depending on the store, can be exactly ten days to the minute or as long as 13 days. Some stores like to drag their feet.
You pay for your rifle, the state sales tax, which I believe now is 8.25% or higher (adds a great deal on if you buy anything 150+$), you are required to buy a CA legal gun lock, which is approximately $4 to $15, or say you have a gun safe. You will need to pay the DROS fee, that is $25 and never will change from store to store, the FFL dealer’s fee, which can be from nothing to I think $65 was the highest I’ve ever paid.
keep the receipt,it is needed when you pick up your gun.
10 or more days later (generally stated on receipt or you can call ahead to see if they count down to the minute) you go to the store, you may need a proof of address paper, you need your ID, to pick up your new rifle.

semiautomatic rifles are no different than any other “long gun”, or shotguns and rifles. just that semiautomatic rifles, some are banned or heavily restricted because the liberals that banned them thought they looked too “evil”. there are legal workarounds for nearly every rifle, but it is expensive and probably not the thing to try on your first rifle. If you buy a semiautomatic, be sure to review the state law regarding “assault rifles” first. something small, like a bayonet lug can make something otherwise legal a felony to buy or possess. Its a very stupid law, probably to trip up new gun owners so they can’t buy guns ever again, so watch out for that and if you’re not sure, don’t buy it or add the accessory item.

Alex55 asked Need information about the Henry Survival Rifle AR-7?

I just ordered one today, it seems to be a fun little rifle. I read many reviews and talked to a few people who had them, and they all recommended high velocity rounds. Remington thunderbolts was a particular round that was talked a lot about but I was curious as to what would be the best round would be to shoot it? Also, where can I find a website that has extra mags and other customizables for it? Thanks in advance to all your help, very very very much appreciated!

And got the following answer:

The AR-7 is an excellent rifle. I was actually quite surprised with its accuracy. I’ve linked a picture below (hope it shows up) that was an informal match between my Henry Arms AR-7 (7x scope) and my brother’s Savage MKII (32x scope). Indoors, 50 feet, using cheap Armscor 36gr high velocity rounds.

Targets on the left were the MKII, targets on the right were my AR-7 (targets in the middle were just messing around). As you can see, in most cases the AR-7 stacks up pretty well. If you look at targets 2 and 3 (which were the untimed, slow-fire targets), the two produced identical “single-ragged-hole” groups. But I’ve done the same with all sorts of rounds. Federal, CCI, all seem to work fine.

I’ve encountered pretty much no problems with reliability. Out of more than 500 rounds in that sitting, there was one failure to fire that was due to a bad primer, and one actual failure to feed. Plus I’ve purposefully been leaving it uncleaned just to see when it might start jamming.

The recommendation about high velocity rounds might be if you’re using it for hunting purposes. Since .22LR is pretty diminutive, that extra energy does tend to help. But in terms of accuracy, high velocity doesn’t seem to make much difference at ranges where you’d use the AR-7 anyhow.

As for accessories, you can try AR-7 Industries (linked below). They make a variety of after-market parts, like a collapsible stock and a barrel shroud. Really though, you’re much better off with just the factory rifle. The after-market stock that I bought is just sitting in a box now, because it really doesn’t add anything to the AR-7. If anything, it actually takes away from the handy floating features that was one of the AR-7’s selling points (I’d like to see an AR-15 float to you if you drop it in a river). They do sell magazines though.

Enjoy your rifle, and all the people looking at you funny at the range when you pull out a “stock”.

Pacheco asked What do i need to buy a Semi-Automatic Rifle in California?

Im turning 18 and i want to know if i need any special permit or any thing of the sort since it is California. Any accurate information will help Thank you.

And got the following answer:

I asked that very same question myself when I turned 18, but to buy a .22LR rifle instead. In California its not much different from any of the neighboring states in terms of requirements, only the procedure is different.

Legally able to keep and bear arms:
18 yrs long gun, 21 handgun (plus HSC permit)
not a felon
no warrants for your arrest (anywhere)
not on trial of a crime that may prohibit you from owning a firearm
mentally sane: no history of mental illness anywhere, anytime
legal citizen of the united states
CA ID or Driver’s License
If ID has no address, you must bring a proof of residence paper (that can be a utility bill or bank statement bill with you address) to show that you live there.

some tips:
don’t buy a pistol caliber rifle, you can’t buy ammo for it until you’re 21. nevermind what the federal or state law says, its some kind of unofficial rule nowadays. It went int o effect around 8 months ago, when I went to buy some more .22LR ammo. I haven’t been able to get any since. Lucky I stockpiled it while it was cheap, some 20k odd rounds or so, and I’m turning 21 soon too. And yes, .22LR applies to this rule. Looks like to me a way to prevent young people from owning guns at all, so no new gun owners anymore?
Don’t buy an AK/AR type rifle as your first firearm, unless you have fired other guns regularly before. You’ll be buying online and its a lot different from buying in a store, and since we’re in California, there is a premium CA residents need to pay for such rifles, generally 200% outside price, loss of”evil” features, and little stumpy 10rd magazines that costs a lot.
Its best to start with the basics when it comes to shooting, there is nothing wrong with buying a .22 as your first rifle. you can learn how to shoulder correctly, use irons sights, use a scope, and ammo is very cheap. Just get some dude 21 or older to buy the ammo for you if the store people won’t let you buy any ammo. Its not illegal, just a hassle.

the process:
you pick out what you’d like to own
the store employee will bring out some paperwork, the employee may ask you for your ID at that time. The paper is ATF form 4473, answer truthfully as possible, the government really does want to know your race, and put your SSN down to avoid misidentification (has happened to me once)
The employee may ask for your thumbprint
a background check is done on the computer (varies by store) then you have a 10 day “cooling off” period, which depending on the store, can be exactly ten days to the minute or as long as 13 days. Some stores like to drag their feet.
You pay for your rifle, the state sales tax, which I believe now is 8.25% or higher (adds a great deal on if you buy anything 150+$), you are required to buy a CA legal gun lock, which is approximately $4 to $15, or say you have a gun safe. You will need to pay the DROS fee, that is $25 and never will change from store to store, the FFL dealer’s fee, which can be from nothing to I think $65 was the highest I’ve ever paid.
keep the receipt,it is needed when you pick up your gun.
10 or more days later (generally stated on receipt or you can call ahead to see if they count down to the minute) you go to the store, you may need a proof of address paper, you need your ID, to pick up your new rifle.

semiautomatic rifles are no different than any other “long gun”, or shotguns and rifles. just that semiautomatic rifles, some are banned or heavily restricted because the liberals that banned them thought they looked too “evil”. there are legal workarounds for nearly every rifle, but it is expensive and probably not the thing to try on your first rifle. If you buy a semiautomatic, be sure to review the state law regarding “assault rifles” first. something small, like a bayonet lug can make something otherwise legal a felony to buy or possess. Its a very stupid law, probably to trip up new gun owners so they can’t buy guns ever again, so watch out for that and if you’re not sure, don’t buy it or add the accessory item.

Lance T asked .50 caliber beowulf? your opinion and feedback?

I’ve been trying to read up on the .50 caliber beowulf that alexander arms sells… i’ve read specs and reviews of gun writers on the range, but i’m curios to hear what people who have actually hunted and shot and abused these guns are. for those of you who dont know, the beowulf is built on the AR platform, and can actually use standard AR-15 mags to shoot.. (one beowulf round fits in the space of two .223)

And got the following answer:

I haven’t ever hunted with my Beowulf, but…

#1, you CAN use standard AR-15 magazines but you run into issues with curvature. This means that you can’t get feed reliability out of a standard USGI 30rd magazine. You do get excellent reliability out of dedicated Beowulf mags, and I imagine that straight, non-curved mags are fine regardless of what round they were originally designed for.

#2, be VERY careful what optics you mount on your Beowulf. They have a penchant for destroying cheap optics, and while a POSP weaver-mount scope will hold up better than NCSTAR or whatnot, it will go the way of the dodo eventually too. I currently use an EOtech on mine, and it’s fine. Just check the screws every now and then.

#3, if you’re recoil sensitive you may not appreciate the Beowulf. I get more of a bruise shooting Beowulf from the shoulder than I do shooting BMG or DTC. Wearing body armor or thicker clothes does help with this considerably, however.

#4, if you’re into reloading, then it’s worth knowing that the Beowulf shares projectiles with 50 Action Express.

#5, due to the large size of the Beowulf brass, there is no dust cover on the ejection port. So, if the dust cover makes a big difference to you, keep this in mind.

Overall, the Beowulf is fun. I’ll never pick it up as my first HD gun, nor will I attempt any long range shots with it. The role that the Beowulf fills is really more like an accurized shotgun slug, than a rifle round. Supposedly the Coast Guard uses Beowulfs to shoot out motors on fleeing drug craft, but I haven’t seen citations to prove it.

Alex55 asked Need information about the Henry Survival Rifle AR-7?

I just ordered one today, it seems to be a fun little rifle. I read many reviews and talked to a few people who had them, and they all recommended high velocity rounds. Remington thunderbolts was a particular round that was talked a lot about but I was curious as to what would be the best round would be to shoot it? Also, where can I find a website that has extra mags and other customizables for it? Thanks in advance to all your help, very very very much appreciated!

And got the following answer:

The AR-7 is an excellent rifle. I was actually quite surprised with its accuracy. I’ve linked a picture below (hope it shows up) that was an informal match between my Henry Arms AR-7 (7x scope) and my brother’s Savage MKII (32x scope). Indoors, 50 feet, using cheap Armscor 36gr high velocity rounds.

Targets on the left were the MKII, targets on the right were my AR-7 (targets in the middle were just messing around). As you can see, in most cases the AR-7 stacks up pretty well. If you look at targets 2 and 3 (which were the untimed, slow-fire targets), the two produced identical “single-ragged-hole” groups. But I’ve done the same with all sorts of rounds. Federal, CCI, all seem to work fine.

I’ve encountered pretty much no problems with reliability. Out of more than 500 rounds in that sitting, there was one failure to fire that was due to a bad primer, and one actual failure to feed. Plus I’ve purposefully been leaving it uncleaned just to see when it might start jamming.

The recommendation about high velocity rounds might be if you’re using it for hunting purposes. Since .22LR is pretty diminutive, that extra energy does tend to help. But in terms of accuracy, high velocity doesn’t seem to make much difference at ranges where you’d use the AR-7 anyhow.

As for accessories, you can try AR-7 Industries (linked below). They make a variety of after-market parts, like a collapsible stock and a barrel shroud. Really though, you’re much better off with just the factory rifle. The after-market stock that I bought is just sitting in a box now, because it really doesn’t add anything to the AR-7. If anything, it actually takes away from the handy floating features that was one of the AR-7’s selling points (I’d like to see an AR-15 float to you if you drop it in a river). They do sell magazines though.

Enjoy your rifle, and all the people looking at you funny at the range when you pull out a “stock”.