Cheapest Night Vision Binoculars

cheap night vision binoculars for sale


Cheapest Night Vision Binoculars News:

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spynet night vision goggles review

hey guys these work great you should get some.


Q&A:

George asked Does Bushnell make good night vision binoculars or monoculars?

Is their perhaps another company i should be looking at. There is alot of wildlife in my fathers backyard and i would like to buy him one for his birthday so he can see the animals at night.

And got the following answer:

they make 5 I believe. The equinox, stealthview, stealthview II, night watch and nightvision. They are not the top brand by any means for night vision but for what your intentions are they would be fine up to about 200 or so yards. They are the cheaper of the brands around 650 to start.

bed. asked Canon 10×42 L Image Stabilization Waterproof Binoculars For Stargazing?

I was thinking about buying the Canon 10×42 L Image Stabilization Waterproof Binoculars. I plan on using them for looking at stars and planets, I read a few reviews saying you can do stargazing, so does that mean i can see all the planets in some detail and star-clusters? And does this mean i can see to some extent in the dark? Like light night vision or am I just seeing the light? Or should I ask if I were to buy these what will i be able to see? Any suggestions about which binoculars would be better/cheaper for stargazing would help never much! Thank You!
Oh and people say the filters that come with it fall off, so which should I buy?

And got the following answer:

Those should be great binoculars, but you would pay a LOT for the image stabilization feature. There can be some situations (e.g. aboard ship or advanced birdwatching) in which that is worthwhile. On land for astronomy it can be more cost effective to use a tripod adapter and tripod. Of course a really good tripod (suitable for photography) can cost almost $200. Be sure to get a model that has a socket for a tripod adapter. Without stabilization 10X is kind of high to be useful handheld. 8X40 is not too bad without a tripod or image stabilization.
Binoculars can show you more stars, some brighter nebulae (e.g. M42 in Orion), closer galaxies (M31, the Andromeda Galaxy can be visible), and star clusters. Not a lot of planetary detail. You might just barely make out Jupiter’s disk and the Galilean moons. Maybe the crescent of Venus. Some of the moon’s larger craters. More magnification is desirable for planets, although avoid cheap telescopes touting many hundreds of times magnification, because it is a dim, shaky, blur.

Dan J asked Where and what do I buy thermal/night-vision binoculars/scopes?

I’m looking to buy a night vision or thermal binoculars or scope. I’m not going to use it for hunting or anything, but more of just something to have… For fun? I guess… Money isn’t too big of a problem, but please, nothing over $300… That said, I have a feeling thermal’s out hahaha.

And got the following answer:

“Money isn’t too big of a problem……. but please, nothing over $300…”

A really nice thermal imaging camera that can tell the difference between a moose and a man at 800yds in a snowstorm – about $630,000.00 You can see them at www.flir.com

Fire departments and people who insulate homes use thermal monoculars to see where the hot spots are in a house fire, or, tell where heat is leaking out. They typically start around $9800 for the cheap ones and $20,000 for a decent one that can take some abuse.

Nightvision scopes are much much cheaper. They are rated at Generation 1, 2, 3, 4 , and 5. Generation 1 is similar to 1970’s Vietnam vintage technology and run between $200-$300 – and most models are cheapo Russian or China stuff that sucks out loud. These things require an Infra Red flood lamp to work decent.

Generation 2-3 are not so bad if you can find an American or model made by a reputable company. Very Important – you need to buy it from a company that is still going to be in business a few years from now incase you need repairs! Ebay, ar15.com, gunbroker.com are the last place you want to buy from – and avoid used ones like the plague. These things are very, very easy to damge the main imager sensor or tube if accidentally exposed to any light!

That said. You say it is just something to have. Try this – go borrow a digital single lens reflex camera (DSLR) – a digital camera where you can adjust the ISO speed and how long the camera iris stays open. When you set such a camera to ISO 400 or faster, with the iris speed set at 2 seconds or more – when pointed at a big, dark area – the image comes out like nightvision. Except it is in color rather than green. (( I do allot of low light photography (aurora) and I design CCTV security systems. )) This works – and when you crank the DSLR up to ISO 1800 or 3200 you can drop the speed down to 1 or .5 seconds and you can easily make out a fox that is 400 yards away in near total darkness.

This camera trick – and even expensive night vision scopes – all requrie some sort of light to work. Starlight is ok – moonlight is awesome. A dark rainy night you won’t get squat unless you have an IR Illuminator.

Upside to that camera trick – you can use it like nightvision and nobody will think you can see anything.

In NV equipment – you get what you pay for…….. and $300 is not enough to get anything that is going to make your happy or impress you.

Good luck

puppy warm-heart asked What to look for when buying binoculars ?

Image stablizer was recommended but I cannot spend 300 to 400 on binoculars. So back to my question, i am just looking for my first binocular to sight-see. What about night vision? I know nothing about binoculars so just wanted a little cheap pair, and figured this site has the most knowledge about what to look for. I do know that the first number is magnification.
No idea where the tds’ are coming from, I think these are excellent answers

And got the following answer:

I have a pair of the cheapest ones. They were a waste of twenty bucks. Go just a bit higher. I also have a pair that cost fifty, they’re much better. Good enough for me. I suppose it depends on what you want them for.

Maurice S asked what is the CHEAPEST generation 2 night vision out there?

i want the cheapest gen.2 night vision..please give the price of it too:D
idk it could be binocular,goggles, or monocular

And got the following answer:

binos 2.0

asked Which binoculars are better for astronomy viewing, the 8×56 or the 10×60?

I was just curious and I wanted to know which set of binoculars would be more powerful or better for astronomy viewing. In other words, comparing 8×56 to 10×60. I own both of them. Bushnell 10×60 and Orion Mini Giant 8×56. Thanks for all of your help and support.

And got the following answer:

They are very close in performance and your own eyes will determine which is better for you and gives a more satisfying view.
In aperture the extra 4mm will show marginally fainter stars but you’ll have to look very carefully under very clear skies to tell the difference and the lenses may not be of equal quality which could wipe out that small difference anyway.
Orion do some nice kit but Bushnell isn’t always so bad either though some makes have fans and people who wouldn’t buy them
I have some Tasco 10×50 bought a couple of days ago…what a surprise!
Sharp and clear, no ghosting, fairly flat field, lovely pair of binos. Not as good as the Helios I normally use but far better than expected with good contrasty views of M42 and M31 and the Pleiades, the glorious star fields in Cygnus early in the evening….what a lovely time.
I got them cheap in a charity shop to add to our collection for school stargazing nights for ten and twelve year old’s to use.
Are they really Tasco…cheap old Tasco?
Sure are…..a pair that turned out pretty good.
You just don’t know till you use stuff that you have something so unexpectedly good.

For 8x and 10x again the difference is marginal in how much detail you can see.
The LGP…light gathering power ….is 7 for the 8x and 6 for the 10x, again making very little difference in practice to the brightness of the image though in theory ( one theory at least) the 8x will be brighter for extended objects like nebulae.
In practice you’ll likely find you can see more on a dark night with the 10x because it has a higher twilight factor but there are critics of the twilight factor ratings as well.
Which binocular matches your own dark adapted eye pupils you can only tell by observation or by measuring your night vision pupil diameter using a very high speed flash with a long lens to keep the flash a few feet away from you or use a filter over the flash but not much f one or the flash speed will go down and you need it to be faster than the closing time of your pupil or eyelids.
Measure the pupil size against a cent or 1-p or whatever stuck on your head with tape, or 1cm marked on paper stuck near your eye or whatever you can fix up.
Be very careful with flashes close to the eye…you can do damage….it’s at your own risk.
To be honest you’ll get different responses from different people using the two binoculars since one will suit some people’s pupils better than the other one but either way it’s a close match so whichever is more comfortable to use is the one to use most.
I spend more time with my 10×50 than the 15×70 because it’s so convenient and comfortable to use so I see more.
Any instrument or a tool or machine is more than a set of figures.
There’s a user and the user has to be happy using the equipment to use it well whether it’s binoculars, telescopes,cameras, golf clubs, fishing rods, cars and motorbikes, or whatever….
Enjoy the sky.

puppy warm-heart asked What to look for when buying binoculars ?

Image stablizer was recommended but I cannot spend 300 to 400 on binoculars. So back to my question, i am just looking for my first binocular to sight-see. What about night vision? I know nothing about binoculars so just wanted a little cheap pair, and figured this site has the most knowledge about what to look for. I do know that the first number is magnification.
No idea where the tds’ are coming from, I think these are excellent answers

And got the following answer:

I have a pair of the cheapest ones. They were a waste of twenty bucks. Go just a bit higher. I also have a pair that cost fifty, they’re much better. Good enough for me. I suppose it depends on what you want them for.

Dan J asked Where and what do I buy thermal/night-vision binoculars/scopes?

I’m looking to buy a night vision or thermal binoculars or scope. I’m not going to use it for hunting or anything, but more of just something to have… For fun? I guess… Money isn’t too big of a problem, but please, nothing over $300… That said, I have a feeling thermal’s out hahaha.

And got the following answer:

“Money isn’t too big of a problem……. but please, nothing over $300…”

A really nice thermal imaging camera that can tell the difference between a moose and a man at 800yds in a snowstorm – about $630,000.00 You can see them at www.flir.com

Fire departments and people who insulate homes use thermal monoculars to see where the hot spots are in a house fire, or, tell where heat is leaking out. They typically start around $9800 for the cheap ones and $20,000 for a decent one that can take some abuse.

Nightvision scopes are much much cheaper. They are rated at Generation 1, 2, 3, 4 , and 5. Generation 1 is similar to 1970’s Vietnam vintage technology and run between $200-$300 – and most models are cheapo Russian or China stuff that sucks out loud. These things require an Infra Red flood lamp to work decent.

Generation 2-3 are not so bad if you can find an American or model made by a reputable company. Very Important – you need to buy it from a company that is still going to be in business a few years from now incase you need repairs! Ebay, ar15.com, gunbroker.com are the last place you want to buy from – and avoid used ones like the plague. These things are very, very easy to damge the main imager sensor or tube if accidentally exposed to any light!

That said. You say it is just something to have. Try this – go borrow a digital single lens reflex camera (DSLR) – a digital camera where you can adjust the ISO speed and how long the camera iris stays open. When you set such a camera to ISO 400 or faster, with the iris speed set at 2 seconds or more – when pointed at a big, dark area – the image comes out like nightvision. Except it is in color rather than green. (( I do allot of low light photography (aurora) and I design CCTV security systems. )) This works – and when you crank the DSLR up to ISO 1800 or 3200 you can drop the speed down to 1 or .5 seconds and you can easily make out a fox that is 400 yards away in near total darkness.

This camera trick – and even expensive night vision scopes – all requrie some sort of light to work. Starlight is ok – moonlight is awesome. A dark rainy night you won’t get squat unless you have an IR Illuminator.

Upside to that camera trick – you can use it like nightvision and nobody will think you can see anything.

In NV equipment – you get what you pay for…….. and $300 is not enough to get anything that is going to make your happy or impress you.

Good luck