Does The Usda Need Night Vision And Drones To Combat Feral Pigs?

Feral swine are pictured in this undated handout from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. (Reuters/USDA).

Its SIGAR against the world right now:Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction John Sopko may make more noise right now than anyone else in the inspectors general community as he battles waste and fraud in a fledgling nation supported in large part by U.S. taxpayers, according to a Washington Post profile . White House mistakenly identifies CIA chief in Afghanistan:The White House inadvertently exposed the CIAs top officer in Kabul by including his name on a list of senior U.S. officials participating in President Obamas surprise visit with U.S. troops in Afghanistan, according to a Washington Post report . Congressional committees reject proposed defense cuts:Members of the House and Senate armed services committees rejected many of President Obamas proposed cost-saving measures for the Defense Department, including closing obsolete facilities, eliminating an attack-aircraft fleet and changes in pay, according to a Washington Post report . VA officials in the hot seat: Three Department of Veterans Affairs officials are scheduled to testify Wednesday before the House Veterans Affairs Committee about what happened with destroyed documents related to the VA scheduling controversy, according to In the Loops round-up of notable hearings .
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Night Enforcer PVS-14 Fusion from Morovision Night Vision Inc.

Flight information symbols of an image source are reflected to the semi-transparent combiner mirror of the head up display, and appear for the observer to be superimposed on the perceived image of the outside world. This has the advantage that the observer does not have to shift his eyesight for gathering flight information. He also avoids having to refocus eyesight, since optical elements usually are arranged to provide a so called collimated image. “Head-up display system are known for use in e.g. military fighter aircraft. These displays presents flight information using a certain colour, in this case green, and the combiner mirror is provided with certain layers of optical coating to reflect light of that certain colour better than light of other colours. This also means that light of other colours are not reflected as much and therefore are transmitted better through the semi-transparent combiner mirror.
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Snooperscope adds night vision to smartphone cameras

The Night Enforcer PVS-14 Fusion system is a helmet mounted or weapon mounted monocular featuring both night vision (I2) and thermal imaging (IR) capabilities fused into one compact system. Night vision can be used independently from the thermal or the two capabilities can be used simultaneously in a variety of modes including black-hot/white-hot overlay and outline. The Night Enforcer PVS-14 Fusion can be broken down into two components (PVS-14 and COTI) to be used individually, adding even more versatility to the unit. Expand for more details on this Product Continue Reading…
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Saab : Patent Issued for Head-Up Display for Night Vision Goggles | 4-Traders

This opens up a lot of potential uses such as mounting it in front of a door for late night visitors. The reason the night vision scope is able to be used this way is because it connects to the iPhone or Android device using Wi-Fi. The device creates its own private network, the user connects to it, and then accesses what the night vision camera sees using the included application. From within the app users can see what the Snooperscope sees, and they can also snap photos and videos. The camera itself uses infrared light that is converted into an image that is visible by the human eye. Because it uses IR, that means the human eye cannot see the light generated by the device, thus allowing it to be used in stealth. PSY Corporation is seeking funding for the Snooperscope on Kickstarter.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.gizmag.com/snooperscope-night-vision/30153/