How To Adjust A Rifle Scope

Rifle Scope Adjustment- Parallax


How To Adjust A Rifle Scope News:

Video: How to Adjust a Rifle Scope | eHow

How to Adjust a Rifle Scope. Part of the series: Shotguns, Handguns & Rifles. When adjusting a rifle scope, make sure to move the cross hairs so that they are in line …

Original Source: http://www.ehow.com/video_4991012_adjust-rifle-scope.html

How To Adjust The Parallax Settings On Your Rifle Scope

What the heck is Parallax? I asked the same thing when I first started looking to upgrade from iron sight to a good rifle scope. This guide should give you …

Original Source: http://ezinearticles.com/?How-To-Adjust-The-Parallax-Settings-On-Your-Rifle-Scope&id=897827

How to Sight-In a Rifle – CHUCKHAWKS.COM: Guns and Shooting Online …

By Chuck Hawks. After you have firmly mounted a scope on your rifle and focused it to your eye, bore sight the rifle. Use a bore collimator or do it the old fashioned …

Original Source: http://www.chuckhawks.com/sight-in_rifle.htm

Video: How to Adjust a Rifle Scope | eHow

How to Adjust a Rifle Scope. Part of the series: Shotguns, Handguns & Rifles. When adjusting a rifle scope, make sure to move the cross hairs so that they are in line …

Original Source: http://www.ehow.com/video_4991012_adjust-rifle-scope.html

How To Adjust The Parallax Settings On Your Rifle Scope

What the heck is Parallax? I asked the same thing when I first started looking to upgrade from iron sight to a good rifle scope. This guide should give you …

Original Source: http://ezinearticles.com/?How-To-Adjust-The-Parallax-Settings-On-Your-Rifle-Scope&id=897827


Set up Your Scope for Success – Rifle Shooting Technique – NSSF Shooting Sportscast

NSSF's Ryan Cleckner shows you how to properly set up your rifle and scope combination so that it naturally aligns with your eye. (NSSF Video) Subscribe to T…


Q&A:

JG M4 S-System asked How do I adjust the windage and elevation on my Rifle Scope?

I tried adjusting it and it worked from like 30 feet away. I was shooting at a target from that far away. I manage to hit every single target. I moved farther and a different spot, aimed the reticule(crosshair) at the target, missed every shot. I saw my bullet shoot the ground and was hitting it only when I moved the crosshair up and to the right. Is there a way to fix this?

And got the following answer:

Let me guess? You’re, kind ‘a, new at this – huh! You have my sympathies; I grew up in a fatherless home; my mother had a strong, even an irrational, fear of guns; and, other than occasional visits from my Marine Corps uncles, I had no one to really teach me how to use firearms – Heck, no gun of any kind was even allowed in our home.

I will never forget what I went through trying to figure out how to sight-in my first 22LR rifle. It was a ridiculously cheap little scope; and I tried every conceivable adjustment before it finally started to hit at, about, 50 yards’ distance.

Tell ya what! I’m going to try to start you out nice ‘n easy – OK. Let’s begin with an explanation of what bullet trajectory is and how bullets really fly.

http://www.loadammo.com/Topics/October01.htm

Now, because all bullets in different calibers and in different rifles have different flight characteristics and trajectories, we’re going to have to make a basic assumption, here: I’m going to take a wild ‘n crazy guess and say that we’re, probably, dealing with a 40 grain 22 long rifle caliber bullet and a 22 caliber rifle. The scope is, something less than, state-of-the-art. (How ’m I doing?)

First thing you’ve got to do is to get that scope mounted nice and plumb on top of that rifle – You want the crosshairs perfectly vertical and horizontal; and you don’t want to use an inappropriate set of mounts that’ll fix the scope too high above the barrel’s bore centerline.

Here’s a hot news flash: Rifle scopes, even 22 rifle scopes, should NOT be setup to operate at 30 feet. ‘Bore sighting’ is for what you’re doing, kind ‘a, overkill. All you need is a couple of (say) 3’ x 3’ pieces of cardboard. You will sight-in your new scope by either lying down or sitting at a shooting bench and bracing the rifle’s fore-end – but NOT its barrel – over something like a rolled up blanket or jacket.

OK, if you’re normal, I know how unpleasant this can be; but, READ THE INSTRUCTIONS that came with the scope. This will give you some important information about how to sight-in that scope. When you’re ready to begin, remove the covers on the vertical and horizontal adjustment knobs. You’ll see a bunch of little, ‘hash marks’ arranged in a circle around a screw. Generally, but not always, each of these marks will cause its respective crosshair to move in a selected direction by either 1 MOA (Minute-Of-Angle) or some increment of 1 MOA.

Here’s an explanation of MOA:

http://www.shootingtimes.com/optics/moast_040407/

Now, after you’ve digested this information, place those 3 foot square pieces of cardboard at: 12, 20, and 40 yards. Get, ‘on the paper’ at 12 yards. (Because of the way a 22LR bullet flies you’re going to want these bullets to hit about a half inch low @ 12 yards. You can begin to make both the vertical AND horizontal adjustments immediately in order to bring the POI (Point-Of-Impact) closer to each respective centerline.

The really tricky adjustment is the vertical POI. (Study that explanation of bullet trajectory, again; and remember it’s going to be different for every: caliber, bullet, and rifle.) Here’s an explanation of 22LR trajectory AND a very useful graphic chart for the high velocity 22LR bullet.

http://www.gunsmoke.com/guns/1022/22ballistics.html

The chart shows you several important things: (1) You’re going to want to mount that scope no higher than 1.5 inches above the rifle’s bore centerline. (It, probably, already is.) (2) You want the scope to be sighted-in DEAD CENTER – not at 30 feet, but – at 20 YARDS.

That’s twice the distance at which you originally tried to set this scope up! (3) If you look closely at the chart you’ll notice that close-in the bullet is going to be flying, ‘level’ at 20 yards. This is where you want your crosshairs AND the bullet’s POI to exactly intersect.

At 40 yards the POI will move up by 1/2 inch. At 66 yards the bullet will have dropped below the line-of-sight. This does NOT mean that you cannot use a 22LR bullet effectively beyond 66 yards. The bullet is still very much, ‘alive’ and potentially lethal to whatever it hits. (I’ve, often, used a 22LR rifle at 75 to 80 yards; it’s called, ‘holdover’.)

Hope this gets you off to a good start!

Henry f asked How do you adjust your rifle scope on the move for longer shots ?

I SIGHT MY RIFLE IN AT 2IN. HIGH AT A HUNDRED YARDS SO THAT I AM DEAD ON AT TWO HUNDRED YARDS.HOW DO YOU NOW WHAT ADJUSTMENT TO MAKE IN THE FIELD WHEN YOU HAVE A 3,4,OR 5 HUNDRED YARD SHOT IN THE FIELD AND YOU DONT HAVE A SPOTTER?

And got the following answer:

if you are willing to take these long range shots you should practice them before hand. see how low you hit for each yardage and adjust the gun by AIMING higher not by changing the scopes elevation. So practice practice practice man, thats what it takes to give you that confindence in the field. Hope I was of some help.

Ozyhan asked What is the side focus and what does adjustable objective mean?

Some rifle scopes have a side focus on it but don’t get its purpose and on the other hand some rifle scopes have adjustable objective lablelled on it. What are their purposes and what do they mean?

And got the following answer:

Both are used to adjust for “parallax”. The knob on the left side of the scope body just makes it more convenient to change this setting when shooting different distances.

Parallax is a condition that occurs when the image of the target is not focused precisely on the reticle plane. It’s visible when there is an apparent movement between the reticle and the target when the shooter moves his head or, in extreme cases, on out-of-focus sight picture.

It is physically impossible for the human eye to focus on 2 things at the same time that are at different distances. The parallax adjustment, whether it is made at the objective lens or with the knob on the scope body, solves this by bringing both the crosshairs and the target that is viewed through the scope into sharp focus at the same time.