Leupold Scope Covers

opplanet-leupold-flipback- ...


Leupold Scope Covers News:

Leupold Alumina Flip-Up Rifle Scope Cover Standard Eyepiece (Rear)

Leupold Alumina Flip-Back Lens Covers offer the protection of a scope cover, with the instant access of a flip-up design. O-ring seals keep out dirt and moisture …

Original Source: http://www.midwayusa.com/product/795923/leupold-alumina-flip-up-rifle-scope-cover-standard-eyepiece-rear-matte

Amazon.com: Leupold Scope Cover Large 53576: Sports & Outdoors

Large scope cover designed for select Leupold riflescopes; Made of water-resistant, nylon-laminated neoprene; Protects your scope from dirt and damage

Original Source: http://www.amazon.com/Leupold-Scope-Cover-Large-53576/dp/B001HN5GX0

Leupold ScopeSmith Rifle Scope Covers 53576, 53578, 53572, 53580 …

Leupold ScopeSmith Rifle Scope Covers will help you to keep your Leupold scope looking like new! Protect its finish from dirtand damage with a scope cover.

Original Source: http://www.opticsplanet.com/leupold-scopesmith-rifle-scope-covers.html

Leupold Alumina Flip-Up Rifle Scope Cover Standard Eyepiece (Rear)

Leupold Alumina Flip-Back Lens Covers offer the protection of a scope cover, with the instant access of a flip-up design. O-ring seals keep out dirt and moisture …

Original Source: http://www.midwayusa.com/product/795923/leupold-alumina-flip-up-rifle-scope-cover-standard-eyepiece-rear-matte

Amazon.com: Leupold Scope Cover Large 53576: Sports & Outdoors

Large scope cover designed for select Leupold riflescopes; Made of water-resistant, nylon-laminated neoprene; Protects your scope from dirt and damage

Original Source: http://www.amazon.com/Leupold-Scope-Cover-Large-53576/dp/B001HN5GX0


The AccuCover flip-up scope cap

Faster, more accurate shooting is what the manufacturer of this ingenious new shooting aid claims – and it really is a lot more than just another flip-up sco…


Q&A:

Gredoc asked How do these Leupold rifle scope covers attach to the scope?

threaded?

These Leupold covers: http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/product/6-0922047

And got the following answer:

You glue them on with epoxy or superglue.

BIGolBOY asked What is a good recoil shock resistant compact scope for an SKS rifle?

All I can find are NC Star, Barska, etc…

And got the following answer:

You can mount any brand of scope on it. I am partial to Nikon. Some prefer Leupold. The real problem in the sks is the lack of a decent mounting location. Some use the receiver cover. It moves. Some use the gas tube. That’s a terrible idea. There are really only two options for a decent mounting location. There is a scout type mount that replaces the rear sight. You must then use a pistol scope. I might recommend the Bushnell Trophy or Burris pistol scope for this arrangement. Second, you can have a gunsmith mount a ak style rail on the side of your receiver. Then you can buy a mount that works with any standard rifle scope. A lot of the inaccuracy myths about the sks stem from people mounting scopes in poor locations on a sks. There just aren’t many decent spots to do it.

Peter Griffin asked Where can I find lens covers for a Leupold Vari XII scope?

Just picked up a Remington 700 (.300RUM) with a Leupold Vari XII scope but it didnt come with lens covers. Anyone know a good website where I can buy lens covers for this model?

And got the following answer:

midway, USA

http://www.midwayusa.com/Search/#lens%20covers____-_1-2-4_8-16-32

The Butler Creek flip up covers work very well.

cdawhit asked I just got a 7mm mag and want to set it up for long range hunting. What is best scope for the task?

I want to be able to range find and field adjust scope for different ranges easily. I’m thinking 4-16×50 or so. Would like to get it for under $400.
I’m talking shots over 500 yds. I currently shoot a 3-9 and it is inadequate. Not enough detail visable. I need to be able to see wind patterns, objects that could deflect the shot and obviously good shot placement.

And got the following answer:

CD I compete on three different types of 1000 yard ranges. From military style to metallic silhouettes. I only use Leupold for my competition rifles and for most of my hunting rifles. Most common is the 6×18 and I have two that go up to 24 power. On the regular 200 to 1000 yard ring targets you can get by with a 3×9. One area to consider is what the target will be and what the surrounding area will be viewed as.
The field you select will need to take into account, ambient light, cloud cover, and what distractions from the background will come into view. One other item you will find invaluable is a GOOD spotting scope. Select one that will allow you to make out the individual lines on a 1000 yard target.
From personal experience I’ll tell you that taking 500 and 1000 yard shots on a range either for practice or for competition is 180 degrees different from taking a 500 or 700 yard shot on a bull elk on a mountain side. I’m comfortable and I enjoy long range hunting, buts I’ve had military training and over 30 years of practice to do so.
All I can tell you is select the optics you feel comfortable with, will allow you to see clearly and define your target. Practice shooting from different angles, positions, elevations, up hill, downhill, and learn how the wind affects your 7mm rounds. Practice, learn, remember, practice, learn remember, that’s the only way to be both functional and ethical in shooting long ranges.

Marcus L asked What is better for 100-300 yard shooting for M4 rifle?

Hi I was just wondering what sort of optic would be the best to get for an M4 Carbine type rifle? Red Dot or a Scope? ACOG even? Also what manufacturer and magnification is best? 3-9×40 or other?

And got the following answer:

That really depends on what you are shooting at, and the results you are trying to achieve. It also depends on personal skill level and ability.

Ringing steel plates with fast acquisition is a lot different from hunting prairie dogs and doing competition shooting.

For shooting steel targets, and “combat” applications. An unmagnified optic such as a red dot or iron sights should be adequate for most people. Of course, your mileage may vary. Not everyone has the sharpest vision, and that’s not your fault. Eyesight can get crappy as you get older, and some people are just born with it.

The ultimate advantage of red dots is fast target acquisition. I’m a huge believer that every rifleman should be excellent with their iron sights, but there is no doubt in my mind that red dots are much faster. The simple answer is common sense. With traditional iron sights, you need to line up 3 planes, the front sight, the rear sight and the target. With red dots you only need to line up 2, the dot and the target. 2 is faster than 3 any day of the week. Co-witnessing the irons and red dot together is highly recommended.

For hunting varmints, or attempting to shoot the tightest group possible, a red dot is a poor choice. That’s because the size of the dot may end up covering the entirety of the target. For instance, a 2 moa dot (like that found on aimpoints) will cover roughly a 2inch circle at 100 yards, and a 6 inch circle at 300 yards. That means if your rifle is shooting 1-2moa, the best group you can expect with it at 300 yards is between 9-12 inches. That’s before you take into account your personal skill level.

A magnified optic is a great choice for people that place accuracy above speed. Target shooters and varminters will argue days on end of the magnification. Really in comes down to personal preference of what you want your magnification to be. Its really hard to go wrong with any qualitybrand and mounts. Weaver and leupold are two that come straight to mind.

Acogs are in a class of their own, depending on the magnification. There is a reason why they are so popular, and expensive.

steve i asked How do I choose the correct scope?

I am getting a Weatherby Vanguard Sporter in a 30-06 for boar hunting. What scope should I get. What power would be suitable?

And got the following answer:

Shooting hogs tends to be a close-in proposition, and often the action is fast. I’d recommend the Leupold VariX II in 2-7x. That’s a good quality commensurate with your rifle, and you want to avoid more magnification. Even then you may occasionally cuss the field of view and wish you had something more like 1-4x on those really close running shots in cover, typical of hog hunting. If you want to spend a bit more, then the same company has a 1.75-6x in the VariX III line that would be even better.