New Tech Could Lead To Night Vision Contact Lenses

New FLIR PathFindIR Night Vision Camera

The U-M researchers have built the first room-temperature light detector that can sense the full infrared spectrum. Infrared light starts at wavelengths just longer than those of visible red light and stretches to wavelengths up to a millimeter long. Infrared vision is perhaps the best known variety of night vision. It can also help visualize heat leaks in houses, help doctors monitor blood flow, identify chemicals in the environment and allow art historians to see Paul Gauguin’s sketches under layers of paint. Unlike comparable mid- and far-infrared detectors currently on the market, the new detector doesn’t need bulky cooling equipment to work. “We can make the entire design super-thin,” said Zhaohui Zhong, assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science. “It can be stacked on a contact lens or integrated with a cell phone.” While conventional cameras can capture the visible spectrum with a single chip, today, infrared imaging requires a combination of technologies to see the whole range — near-, mid- and far-infrared radiation — all at once.
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“It can be stacked on a contact lens or integrated with a cell phone.” The key to the new technology is a lightweight and super-strong form of carbon known as graphene. Ordinarily, graphene absorbs only about 2.3 percent of light that hits it — not enough to generate a usable infrared signal. But by combining two layers of graphene with an insulator, the researchers were able to boost the signal dramatically. Sensors made of sandwiched graphene can detect the full infrared spectrum, in addition to visible and ultraviolet light. Zhong and his team have yet to integrate their technology into contact lenses, but he says the technological pathway to such devices is clear.
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Snooperscope adds night vision to smartphone cameras

The device creates its own private network, the user connects to it, and then accesses what the night vision camera sees using the included application. From within the app users can see what the Snooperscope sees, and they can also snap photos and videos. The camera itself uses infrared light that is converted into an image that is visible by the human eye. Because it uses IR, that means the human eye cannot see the light generated by the device, thus allowing it to be used in stealth.
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Night-Vision Contact Lenses That Use Infared Technology May Soon Be Possible, Researchers Say

Portland, OR FLIR Systems (NASDAQ:FLIR) announced the release of the all new PathFindIR II thermal night vision system. With the latest video analytics algorithms, PathFindIR II provides automated detection and alerts of pedestrians and animals, so you can see hazards sooner, react faster, and stay safer on the road than ever before. Whether you drive on crowded city streets or quiet country roads, PathFindIR II installs easily in cars, trucks, and industrial vehicles of every kind. PathFindIR IIs thermal night vision gives you the power to see pedestrians, cyclists, animals, and other road hazards that are in or approaching the road from either side by detecting the heat signature of everything in its field of vision.
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