Night Vision Camcorder See Through Clothes

See Through Clothes Clothing Experiments IR X-Ray See Through Vision


Night Vision Camcorder See Through Clothes News:

News, briefly

See what's happening in and around Kingston.

Original Source: http://www.wickedlocal.com/kingston/news/x1803838169/News-briefly?rssfeed=true

News, briefly

See what's happening in and around Kingston.

Original Source: http://www.wickedlocal.com/kingston/news/x1803838169/News-briefly?rssfeed=true

News, briefly

See what's happening in and around Kingston.

Original Source: http://www.wickedlocal.com/kingston/news/x1803838169/News-briefly?rssfeed=true

News, briefly

See what's happening in and around Kingston.

Original Source: http://www.wickedlocal.com/kingston/news/x1803838169/News-briefly?rssfeed=true

News, briefly

See what's happening in and around Kingston.

Original Source: http://www.wickedlocal.com/kingston/news/x1803838169/News-briefly?rssfeed=true


Infrared See-Through Test 2 – Sony HDR-CX130

This camcorder isn't very good at all for filming infrared. Shortwave infrared just barely visible by his unit with the 760nm filter that I have installed; t…


Q&A:

[email protected] asked is it true that sony actually distributed and sold camcorders that could see through clothes?

is it true that in 1998 sony sold 700,000 camcorders that had x-ray abilities to see through clothes in night vision mode? why didnt they know? or did they lol?
thanks

And got the following answer:

see through clothes is a real stretch. all CCD imagers have visual acuity in the infra-red band where normal human vision does not. to prevent odd looking pictures, most cameras add a filter to block out IR. Night vision cameras do not have the filter, and employ IR emitting LEDs (like on your TV remote control) to provide illumination. So unless your clothes is somehow transparent to IR, (not too likely) then it does not see through them but reflects off like normal light does. This is further confused with IR type cameras which can detect the heat given off by an object. Since the body gives off heat, which passes through clothes, then you could call this a kind of x-ray effect. what you see is a warm glow, like off a candle, not the outline of a persons naked body!

Generally this feature is for intrusion alarms and nature photographers trying to capture nocturnal animals in total darkness that this IR night vision is of any use, so Sony put the missing filter back in the camera. You can still get night vision cameras, but don’t expect to see through any clothes.

Mason asked Night Vision Camcorder……..?

Hi! I was looking for a night vision camcorder (preferably $400 or less)… I came across only one and it seemed to have mixed reviews… it was the Bell & Howell DNV16HDZ Full HD Rogue Night Vision Camcorder. I would like something similar if possible. Thanks for any suggestions!

And got the following answer:

Hi Mason:

The Bell & Howell camcorders, in general, get mixed reviews because just like Polaroid (which used to be a giant American corporation in the instant camera business) the Bell & Howell name mainly exists as part of a “brand management company” that licenses its trademark to various gadgets and appliances (and even luggage & desklamps) made by different manufacturers (mostly in China).

Bell & Howell is no longer the well-respected movie camera/movie projector & audio-visual company it was in the last century. (Polaroid gadgets are now pretty much junk, too, from my personal experience.)

So just having a known name-brand that “used to be great” is no assurance of current quality.

I know you enjoy the outdoors and are planning an upcoming backpack trip (from your recent Q&A discussions), and a night-vision camcorder would be a cool thing to take along.

Camcorders with infrared sensitivity (“night vision”) were a popular thing way-before the current fad of “Ghost Hunter” type TV shows came along, but some bad publicity with Sony’s NightShot camcorders being able to “see through clothes” caused most of the major brands to filter-out the IR sensitivity of their consumer models.

You can still find “NightShot” (Sony), “Super LoLux” (JVC), and “Night Mode” (Canon) features, just not many in your price range. These all require at least some infrared light source (or dim ambient light from the surroundings) to register an image.

Here’s a good article from last year, outlining popular camcorders with good IR sensitivity: http://www.squidoo.com/best-camcorders-with-night-vision A surprising entry in the article is the Funai pocket camcorder (model SV310FX1B) that’s under-$100.

True military-style night vision uses image multiplier tubes (a/k/a “star scopes” from their ability to see by mere starlight), and these sort of lens attachments for camcorders run into the thousands of dollars (like the Astroscope brand).

I know most of the camcorders with decent prices are mail-order/online-only, but I’m a big advocate of “try before you buy”. So read a few online articles like the one I linked to above (and do your own “night vision camcorders” search for reviews & prices) and make an informed decision within your budget.

To stretch your budget dollars, consider either a used NightShot model (I’ve had good luck on eBay) or shop places like Canon USA’s refurbished camcorders section on their website: http://shop.usa.canon.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/subCategorySort_10051_10051_-1_17252_lowPrice_list

hope this helps,
–Dennis C.
 

Unknown Man asked What equipment should I bring to paranormal investigation?

On October 30th, through 31st, I am planning on just going to look
through my town cemetery for paranormal activity. I am very curious about ghosts, and I hope to find ghosts on camera.

If so, what equipment would be necessary, and helpful for my investigation. They also close the gates at dark so I might have to sneak in and out, or stay overnight with/without permission.

And got the following answer:

Firstly, best not to go alone if you can help it… for one, there may be other people who use the cemetry for unsavoury dealings and you could put yourself in danger also if you trip or fall and injure yourself, there will be no-one around, also, 2 people can record paranormal events and then things can be properly seconded… after all, if someone tells you that they saw a ghost it can be a trick of the mind, if 2 people saw the same thing and told you… you’d be more inclined to believe it.
If you’re sneaking in and will be there all night (although this is not advisable), you will need warm and dark clothes, 2/3 layers should do it. Just try not to wear alot of synthetic layers as these can build up static charge which may have an adverse effect on your equipment. Also take a rain mac… after all, you never know!

Then, a CAMERA/VIDEO CAMERA.. either one that has a flash or, you can use an IR floodlight with some digital models. (To check if your camera or camcorder can see IR, point a remote contol at the veiw-finder and if it can be seen as a bluish light then your model can be used in the dark with an IR floodlight).
It’s always good to have a DIGITAL WATCH with a backlight so you can record times of the happenings.
PEN
PAPER
CLIPBOARD
DIGITAL VOICE RECORDER
ANALOGUE VOICE RECORDER
THERMOMETER
FLASHLIGHT – Best if you can get some red film, maybe a clear red candy wrapper, to cover the beam. This will stop the light from affecting your eyes too much and will help you keep your night vision for longer. (also it will be less noticeable from outside)
FOOD – High sugar content foods such as chocolate and glucose drinks… try and avoid caffeine as it can alter your mind-state and cause hallucinations.
DRINK – Try and take a thermos of tea or hot chocolate… this will help keep you warm on your vigil.
MOBILE PHONE/CELLPHONE – if you need help or get into trouble
BATTERIES – always good to carry a few spares
EMF METER – if you have one… sometimes cables can be laid in some very strange places and this would help you to find anomalies in the EMF

I would advise also that you tell someone where you are going and arrange to call/meet them at a time you can keep on the day after your vigil. SAFETY FIRST!

RESEARCH… do some research after your investigation into experiences that others have had in the same location. This information can be found at your local library and in the archives of your local newspaper as well as local legends/tales. these will help you if you want to write-up your findings.

If you need any more info about ghost hunting or any advice I would be glad to help.

Good luck mate,
Scooby
[email protected]

Amanda [Taylor.] asked what exactly does infrared do/mean on a camcorder?

my brother just got one today that was under $250, and he thinks that infrared means seeing through people’s clothing.
is that true?
i seems like a stupid question, but i dont know.
i know it has a night vision thing or something you can see in the dark.
maybe that has something to do with it?
he thinks he can go into the mall and see through peoples clothing or something now…. 😐

And got the following answer:

I think the Sony camcorders are doing infra-red lately. Camcorders do poorly in low light. By using infra-red, it looks like night vision goggles, but at least you can record in the night time.

You won’t be able to see through people’s clothes – that was funny!

Dan N asked Did someone really invent x-ray glasses?

I have trouble believing that this is possible. I found this link on some web page ( http://www.xolllab.com/ ) they claim to have invented x-ray glasses. I honestly don’t know anything about the technology that would be required for something like this. I do know that with some camcorders it is possible to see through things when the camera is in night vision mode. So are the glasses real or not? What do you think?

And got the following answer:

That’s a hoax.

First, to get x-ray imaging, you need a good x-ray source, which in current technology is given by accelerating electrons in a high potential and them stopping them in a metal plate. The electrons give a characteristic radiation called “brehmstralung” and is in the x-ray region of the electromagnetic sprectrum (you can see this piece of equipment next time you go see your dentist). These glasses do not even have an x-ray source in them.

Second, the x-ray “before” and “after” pictures shown are completely unrealistic. You might be able to see the flesh outline of a person with low-energy x-rays and perhaps some other features, but you will mostly see bright bones and outlines of general features of dense materials (such as that bomb you might be hiding in your bag at the airport).

The way x-ray imaging works is because x-rays are high-energy photons (light) that only stop in dense materials, and the amount of “stopping” depends on the density of the material. You emit x-rays on one side of an object, collect them on the *opposite* side, and generate an image (usually with film) that tells you how much x-rays you got in different places. That’s how you generate images. Thus, clothing items and flesh are very weak to stop x-rays, and do so in small amounts. You cannot use x-rays to only “filter” out the clothing part.

Shenanigans.

Mason asked Night Vision Camcorder……..?

Hi! I was looking for a night vision camcorder (preferably $400 or less)… I came across only one and it seemed to have mixed reviews… it was the Bell & Howell DNV16HDZ Full HD Rogue Night Vision Camcorder. I would like something similar if possible. Thanks for any suggestions!

And got the following answer:

Hi Mason:

The Bell & Howell camcorders, in general, get mixed reviews because just like Polaroid (which used to be a giant American corporation in the instant camera business) the Bell & Howell name mainly exists as part of a “brand management company” that licenses its trademark to various gadgets and appliances (and even luggage & desklamps) made by different manufacturers (mostly in China).

Bell & Howell is no longer the well-respected movie camera/movie projector & audio-visual company it was in the last century. (Polaroid gadgets are now pretty much junk, too, from my personal experience.)

So just having a known name-brand that “used to be great” is no assurance of current quality.

I know you enjoy the outdoors and are planning an upcoming backpack trip (from your recent Q&A discussions), and a night-vision camcorder would be a cool thing to take along.

Camcorders with infrared sensitivity (“night vision”) were a popular thing way-before the current fad of “Ghost Hunter” type TV shows came along, but some bad publicity with Sony’s NightShot camcorders being able to “see through clothes” caused most of the major brands to filter-out the IR sensitivity of their consumer models.

You can still find “NightShot” (Sony), “Super LoLux” (JVC), and “Night Mode” (Canon) features, just not many in your price range. These all require at least some infrared light source (or dim ambient light from the surroundings) to register an image.

Here’s a good article from last year, outlining popular camcorders with good IR sensitivity: http://www.squidoo.com/best-camcorders-with-night-vision A surprising entry in the article is the Funai pocket camcorder (model SV310FX1B) that’s under-$100.

True military-style night vision uses image multiplier tubes (a/k/a “star scopes” from their ability to see by mere starlight), and these sort of lens attachments for camcorders run into the thousands of dollars (like the Astroscope brand).

I know most of the camcorders with decent prices are mail-order/online-only, but I’m a big advocate of “try before you buy”. So read a few online articles like the one I linked to above (and do your own “night vision camcorders” search for reviews & prices) and make an informed decision within your budget.

To stretch your budget dollars, consider either a used NightShot model (I’ve had good luck on eBay) or shop places like Canon USA’s refurbished camcorders section on their website: http://shop.usa.canon.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/subCategorySort_10051_10051_-1_17252_lowPrice_list

hope this helps,
–Dennis C.