Night Vision Contact Lenses May Be An Eye-opening Development

Zhaohui Zhong, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Michigan, told the Independent that contact lenses may someday be able to register the full infrared spectrum plus visible and ultraviolet light. “We can make the entire design super-thin,” Zhong said of graphene lenses. “It can be stacked on a contact lens or integrated with a cell phone.” In the future there wont be the need for bulky night vision goggles use by commandos and cat burglars. APThis undated publicity photo released by Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. shows Navy SEALs seen through the greenish glow of night vision goggles, as they prepare to breach a locked door in Osama Bin Laden’s compound in Columbia Pictures’ hyper-realistic new action thriller from director Kathryn Bigelow, “Zero Dark Thirty.” (AP Photo/Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc., Jonathan Olley) The Independent reported : Previous attempts to use graphene in this way have suffered from the materials insensitivity towards parts of the light spectrum.
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night-vision contact lenses

Engineers at the University of Michigan have used graphene – a material formed from a single layer of carbon atoms – to create sensors that can detect the full spectrum of light, including infrared. The sensors detect light by measuring the behaviour of electrons and changes in current between two layers of the material, separated by an insulator. Usually infrared sensors such as those found in night-vision goggles require bulky cooling to prevent the devices overheating, increasing their size. However, the graphene sensors do not require cooling so can be produced as small as a fingernail and developed to be tinier still. Once small enough, the sensors could be embedded into contact lenses or mobile phones camera lenses and used to create imagery in completely dark environments. Last year graphene was earmarked by scientists as a possible solution for thinner and more pleasurable condoms .
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Profiting from Night Vision Optics

Exelis night vision optics

Researchers at Univ. of Mich. have created an extremely thin and light material from graphene that can detect infrared light. The material could be used in a smartphone or as contacts, say the researchers.
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Night vision goggles

Given that the Pentagon recently announced major personnel cuts to the Army and major financial and equipment cuts to all branches of the armed service, in the meantime retaining full funding for the Special Forces, it’s not a major leap to expect our government to maintain clandestine operations at the current rate for at least the foreseeable future. Some would call this sort of thinking paranoid or forgive the pun “dark,” but I just look at it as recognizing a trend. And this is one we’ve been building towards for more than a decade now.
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