Night Vision Is Finally Awesome Again (yes, Even Though These Goggles Look Super Dorky)

SA Photonics’ new Hi-Res Night Vision System brings it back up to speed. The new system addresses two of the most common requests for the technology from U.S. Air Force pilots: a wider field of vision and higher resolution images. The horizontal field of vision has been increased to 55 degrees, which expands to 82.5 degrees because it’s combined with a partial binocular overlap.
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Night vision goggles for all troops in Afghanistan

IR night vision, ITT

Initially, it will augment the AN/PVS-5 NVG, and over time, it will replace the AN/PVS-5. The Marine Corps is interested in procuring a clip-on Night Vision Magnification Device (NVMD) to satisfy the need to see targets at the maximum effective range of its weapons. Description The AN/PVS-7B is a single-tube night vision goggle, Generation III image intensifier which uses prisms and lenses to provide the user with simulated binocular vision. The Marine Corps is acquiring the AN/PVS-7B, a model which incorporates a high light level protection circuit in a passive, self-contained image intensifier device which amplifies existing ambient light to provide the operator a means of conducting night operations. A shipping case, soft carrying case, eyepiece and objective lens cap, and filter are ancillary items.
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ORNGE considers night-vision goggles for its aircraft

In the wake of two night crashes including a fatal accident on May 31 ORNGE says it is now considering equipping its helicopters with night-vision goggles. The sophisticated gear gives pilots a better view of their surroundings in darkness, to aid in takeoffs and landings and watch for hazards. Its absolutely on the table, said Dr. Andrew McCallum, president and CEO of ORNGE, the provinces medical transport service, which operates both fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters to move patients around Ontario.
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AN/PVS-7B Night Vision Goggles

“So lets assume that Iraq and Afghanistan have 250,000 soldiers all using these glasses. If you change a quarter of a million batteries every day, these lithium ion batteries cost $3 a piece. Just do the maths,” he said. Mr Scott said that because the sets use less power, the phosphor screens would last longer, extending its service life, and halving the number of batteries made the unit lighter. The original order was due for completion over a three year period, but ITT said that manufacturing was sped up due to an “urgent request” from the MoD. “You don’t want to train with goggles that don’t let you see so well at night and then get a better goggle when you go into combat,” said Mr Scott “So we have rearranged our production at our plant in Virginia and we are now delivering 80% of that order by the end of this year, and the rest by the first quarter of next year,” he added. Scope out Night sights can be broken down into two main categories – thermal imaging and near infrared (IR) – both of which are in use in Afghanistan.
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