Scientists Make New Sensor That Could Lead To Night Vision Contact Lenses | The Verge

Too Much Night Vision In Malaysian Found-Footage ‘Ia Wujud’ –

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The researchers, Ted Norris and Zhaohui Zhong, faced a major hurdle with graphene: it just isn’t very sensitive to light. “Its a hundred to a thousand times lower than what a commercial device would require,” said Zhong in a statement . So instead of relying directly on the graphene’s sensitivity to light, the scientists decided to measure an electrical current running alongside the graphene layer. Their findings, published last month in Nature Nanotechnology , explain that as light hits the top graphene layer, it leaves a measurable impact on the flow of electricity below it. That produces an electrical signal that can display a night vision image. “If we integrate it with a contact lens or other wearable electronics, it expands your vision, said Zhong.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.theverge.com/2014/4/6/5586966/new-infrared-sensor-could-make-night-vision-contact-lenses-a-reality

New Statesman | Graphene contact lenses could give everyone night vision

According to Wired , researchers Ted Norris and Zhaohui Zhong have been working on an ultra-thin infrared light sensor that’s made from graphene – a material that’s only an atom thick. The graphene could potentially be layered onto contact lenses in order to absorb infrared rays and translate them into an electrical signal. When the team placed a layer of insulation between two layers of graphene and added an electrical current, they found the electrical reaction was able to be converted into a visible image. “If we integrate it with a contact lens or other wearable electronics, it expands your vision,” said Zhong.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.shinyshiny.tv/2014/04/night_vision_contact_lenses.html

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Heres a loose translation: Tells of a group of teenagers who entered the abandoned theme park called Mimaland. This story takes place before the phenomenon of horror stories in the Highland Tower. They thought ghosts did not exist and tried to play a game of spirit of the coin in the abandoned theme park. Ultimately what they are looking for is actually there. Itll open in their theaters May 15.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://bloody-disgusting.com/news/3287302/too-much-night-vision-in-malaysian-found-footage-ia-wujud/

Night vision contact lenses could soon turn us all into superheroes : Shiny Shiny

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A stealthier, more lightweight solution may come as a result of research by electrical engineerZhaohui Zhong and his team from the University of Michigan. They’ve been looking at graphene, the single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a crystal structure that many have described as a wonder material for its startling range of qualities: it conducts electricity at room temperature like a superconductor at near-absolute zero; it’s incredibly strong, and could be used for building elevators to space; it’s as stiff as diamond, yet also extremely elastic; it’s the most impermeable substance ever discovered; and it’s almost completely transparent, but it can also absorb light across all wavelengths. That last point makes it a potentially very useful tool for building sensors, yet it does have a weakness – as graphene is essentially two-dimensional, it only absorbs around 2.3 per cent of the light that hits it, even if it’s light of all types. The Michigan team were researching ways to overcome this shortcoming, because it would be awesome be to be able to build sensors as light, strong and flexible as graphene. And, according to the study, published in Nature Nanotechnology , they may have succeeded in a first step. When light hits graphene it knocks some electrons out from the carbon atoms, causing a slight positive charge.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.newstatesman.com/future-proof/2014/04/graphene-contact-lenses-could-give-everyone-night-vision