Soon, Night Vision Contact Lenses – Hindustan Times

Electrical Engineers, Ted Norris and Zhaohui Zhong, at the University of Michigan discovered a method to sense infrared light using two layers of an atom-thick layer of carbon, known as graphene, the Verge reported. Instead of relying directly on the graphene’s sensitivity to light, Norris and Zhong measured an electrical current running alongside the graphene layer. Their findings revealed that as light hits the top graphene layer, it leaves a measurable impact on the flow of electricity below it and produces an electrical signal which could display a night vision image. Zhong said integrated with a contact lens or other wearable electronics, it expands your vision. The findings have been published in journal Nature Nanotechnology.
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Article metrics for: Graphene photodetectors with ultra-broadband and high responsivity at room temperature : Nature Nanotechnology : Nature Publishing Group

The M914A monocular mounts on an officers head, helmet, or a weapons Picatinny rail. Using a Third Generation intensifier for improved image clarity, the device offers 1x magnification and features a bright-light cut-off system to protect the tube from bright light. The monocular uses a single AA battery, which lasts 40 hours and the device weighs in at just over half a pound. In addition to the monocular, the company also makes compact and lightweight Binocular Night Vision Devices, which use Third Generation intensifier tubes.
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Scientists make new sensor that could lead to night vision contact lenses | The Verge

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Electrical Engineers at the University of Michigan have found a new way to sense infrared light using two layers of an atom-thick layer of carbon, known as graphene. Unlike prior methods, the substance doesn’t have to be cooled to extremely low temperatures, and the device is very thin and small. The researchers, Ted Norris and Zhaohui Zhong, faced a major hurdle with graphene: it just isn’t very sensitive to light. “Its a hundred to a thousand times lower than what a commercial device would require,” said Zhong in a statement . So instead of relying directly on the graphene’s sensitivity to light, the scientists decided to measure an electrical current running alongside the graphene layer. Their findings, published last month in Nature Nanotechnology , explain that as light hits the top graphene layer, it leaves a measurable impact on the flow of electricity below it.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.theverge.com/2014/4/6/5586966/new-infrared-sensor-could-make-night-vision-contact-lenses-a-reality

EOTech/L-3 Warrior Systems Night Vision & Thermal Devices from CMC GOVERNMENT SUPPLY

Headlines & Global News The strongest material in the world could augment our future vision, letting us see in infrared light. Discovery News Soon you may be putting on contact lenses that give you infrared vision without the need for a contraption covering your face. And the new technology also has medical applications, such as letting doctors monitor blood flow.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.nature.com/nnano/journal/vaop/ncurrent/nnano.2014.31/metrics/news